Self-Improvement: Change One Small Thought at a Time

Choose to be: The Kind of Person Who Goes With The Flow

Choose to be: The Kind of Person Who Goes With The Flow

My friend, Joelle, just had a birthday. She got cards and calls from everyone she loves—except for one friend.

“I built up a real resentment,” Joelle said. “It didn’t matter that 50 people remembered my birthday—the fact that this one person didn’t kind of ruined my day.”

That happens to a lot of us—we are in a field of clovers but focus only on the one piece of litter. I once gave a lecture to a roomful of women who seemed to like my speech. They laughed a lot. But all I can remember is two women who sat in the fifth row, their faces blank, their eyes stone cold. They didn’t seem to like me and I couldn’t shake the image of them. Instead of focusing on what is good, I could only focus on the one bad thing. Their disapproval seemed to erase the applause.

Maybe it’s instinct? Back when we were foragers, we had to keep our eye out on the dangers. We had to look for the poisonous mushrooms if we wanted to stay alive. We had to concentrate on what might harm us. This might be holdover behavior—we don’t even know we’re doing this.

But then Joelle had a revelation. She thought, “I want to be one of those people who take things in stride, who forgive people automatically, we drop resentments as soon as they come up, who focus on the abundance and not the one thing that might be missing.”

And, ta-da! Joelle said she made a conscious decision to think differently. And it worked. “I suddenly felt like I really was that kind of forgiving person,” she said. She wants to be the kind of person who goes with the flow of the waterfall instead of stumbling on the stones.

Living our best chapter means trying new behavior. It also means thinking in a new sort of way.

It means saying, “I’m the kind of person who_____” and then filling in the blank in a new, creative way. “I’m the kind of person who doesn’t care if someone forgets my birthday,” Joelle told me. “Because I’m easygoing and cool.”

What new way of being can you take on today? Remember to be MORE you, sometimes you have to be LESS you.

Here’s an interesting article in The New York Times on changing our own behaviors and attitudes.

Advertisements

About dianabletter

Diana Bletter is a writer living in northern Israel whose novel, A Remarkable Kindness, is forthcoming from HarperCollins in August. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, tabletmag, and other publications. Her first book, The Invisible Thread: A Portrait of Jewish American Women (with photographs by Lori Grinker) was nominated for a National Jewish Book Award.
This entry was posted in Be Less You To Be More You, miracles, Resentment and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Self-Improvement: Change One Small Thought at a Time

  1. Diana, so glad Joelle had a “revelation”. People will always let us down. That’s why it’s important not to put others on a pedestal. Although, my pedestal is wonderful. LOL Just kidding. 🙂

  2. We change our lives one day at a time, one thought at a time, one breath at a time.
    And when we realize that one negative, resentful thought can ruin an entire day, we learn to change that thought and save our day.
    Absolutely!

    • dianabletter says:

      Yes, keep breathing deep and change our lives, as you said so wisely, one thought and one breath at a time. Thanks, Marylin!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s