If You’ve Reached The End of The Rope, Tie a Knot and Hang On.

When the universe takes something from your grasp, it’s not punishing you, but merely opening your hands to receive something better. Concentrate on this sentence:

“The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you.”

Something good will happen to you today, something that you have been waiting to hear. Don’t allow yourself to break down. If you feel like you’ve reached the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

This was written in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Sometimes we just don’t understand. I was fascinated by the words of Rabbi Shaul Praver in an article in The New York Times here who tried to comfort Veronique Pozner who lost her son, Noah, in the massacre. The rabbi asked her if she remembered her 6-year-old self. She did. “When we become adults,” he said, “our 5- and 6-year-olds didn’t die with us; they’re contained within a larger vessel.”

Nothing is lost. Everything is contained within our universe, even if we can’t see it. Sometimes that is not much consolation.

All we can do is get through the next minute. And the minute after that.

 

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About dianabletter

Diana Bletter is a writer living in northern Israel whose novel, A Remarkable Kindness, is forthcoming from HarperCollins in August. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, tabletmag, and other publications. Her first book, The Invisible Thread: A Portrait of Jewish American Women (with photographs by Lori Grinker) was nominated for a National Jewish Book Award.
This entry was posted in Acceptance, Being a Hero In Your Life and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to If You’ve Reached The End of The Rope, Tie a Knot and Hang On.

  1. Thanks for this, Diana.
    Rabbi Praver’s words are a comfort we sorely need. We also understand, I think, that Veronique Pozner would give anything to have one more real, physical, loving hug with her son. Sorrow is a slow heal. The wound is very deep.

  2. Hi Diana, such a beautiful post.
    You’re right. It’s one minute and then the next.
    It makes me realize I need to appreciate everyone of those precious minutes. Tick, tick, tick.

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