15 Things I Wish I Could Have Told My Younger Self

Things I Wish I Could Tell My Younger Self

Don’t take rejections so seriously. Appreciate how great it feels to get out of bed without one ache in your body and hurt in your heart. Appreciate your friends because soon they’ll start dying on you. Don’t waste your days – you really don’t have that many to squander — and make each of them a page in the chapters of your life. Don’t spend too much money on trendy clothes you’ll only wear once. But if you do, save those clothes because they’ll come back in style. Never say, “I’d never do this or that” because chances are you’ll do this — and that, too. You will not regret what you did, only what you didn’t do. Look in the mirror and enjoy your face. Look deep into your own eyes and tell yourself that you are your very best friend. Never abandon yourself to gain someone else’s approval. Remember that things always take longer than you think. Remember that life is harder than you think. Give extra-generous tips at restaurants and beauty salons because you won’t miss the extra money in your wallet but you will savor the feeling of generosity. Focus on being successful at one thing only – being the hero of your own life.

What are some things you wish you could have told your younger self?

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About dianabletter

Diana Bletter is a writer living in northern Israel whose novel, A Remarkable Kindness, is forthcoming from HarperCollins in August. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, tabletmag, and other publications. Her first book, The Invisible Thread: A Portrait of Jewish American Women (with photographs by Lori Grinker) was nominated for a National Jewish Book Award.
This entry was posted in Being a Hero In Your Life, Your Best Chapter and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to 15 Things I Wish I Could Have Told My Younger Self

  1. Si says:

    Wow! I wish that I could have written that. Right on!!

  2. stuartart says:

    I have mixed feelings about this. On one hand we are who we are because of what we’ve been through, therefore if we could tell our younger selves something we might change all of that and we’d be different. Would we have learned the same lessons? On the other hand I ask my students to consider their 110 year old self visiting from their perfect future, and ask them to ask for advice. In some way that would be doing the same thing – interfering with the process. Hmm, it is only a thought exercise after all. 🙂

    • dianabletter says:

      We are always learning lessons…Your exercise is also fascinating – maybe I’ll do that one, too. Thanks!

  3. Sharon says:

    Ditto to all the things on your list. Some others are: Get rid of anger and all negative feelings asap – holding on to them only hurts yourself; Slow down – if you think you are aware and appreciating life, take things even one notch slower and be aware of the present moment for all its worth. There are so many but i think that we can only really understand most of them with age and experience.

    • dianabletter says:

      You have a point that we can’t “get” all those bits of wisdom until we spend a bit more time on earth. Thanks for that point.

  4. Nancy says:

    I would have told my younger self….Enjoy those hula hoops now, and you ability to keep them
    moving, because they will eventually go out of style… and so will your ability to rotate those hips!

  5. Love the list! I might add that expressing gratitude daily, often in the tiniest way, is a powerful lifelong practice that one is never too young to begin.

    • dianabletter says:

      Great comment! When my kids were little before they went to sleep, I always asked them to say one thing they were thankful for. Thanks for the reminder!

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